This year was trying to say the least. Though our journey through this new reality is not over, I am proud of the connections and creations I have made in the latter part of the summer.
I met determined black women. Discovered their talent and collaborated in their artistic visions. We laughed, cried and grew together. But most importantly we hoped, dreamed and bonded over our quest to represent excellence: black excellence!
In this blog, I will break down the products and techniques used to create what I am proud to call my most stunning bridal looks yet.

PRELUDE FOR THE DREAM
After June 2nd I set out to put my feelings into words.
On September the 18th , after weeks of painful self reflection, I finished my latest and most personal post to date: I’ve Been a fraud.
In it I make a set of promises to myself as well as my clients, notably, the promise to become completely unapologetic about my blackness as well as what I experience on a day to day basis.
To succeed, I am sure I will lose some and strengthen my bond with others.
I shall push forward, regardless. Look for allies to my cause, lean on friends, family and most importantly, continue to use my black voice to affect change in my community.
It is in that spirit that I welcomed a meeting with Nathalee from Ma Cherie Bleue
She asked me to join her and the Marilyn Event Planner team for a shoot and I just knew I had to stop everything I was doing and just create.
To say I am happy the results would be an understatement…
We set out to create a modern, chic luxury bridal event centered around Ayé, a stunning model from Ivory Coast and her boyfriend, Mike Di Genova, founder of Prose Vodka.

FIRST TASK: DREAMING THE DREAM
I started, as I always do, by creating mood boards of my inspirations and once approved, I invested in the necessary products. Notably some Fenty Beauty (I HAD to…) and Sweed Lashes.

As you will see below, I was inspired by sparkly smokey eyes and soft cut creases. My take on a modern version of a 1960s classic to pair with the gowns’ shape.

 

SECOND TASK: CREATE THE DREAM
Marilyn Event Planner and Nathalee from Ma Cherie Bleue grouped the cream of the crop when it came to Montréal wedding specialists.

I had the absolute HONOR to work with the following creators…

Photography | Manoucheka La Cherie

Dresses | Hayley Paige

Suits for MEN | BAGGISTORE

Vidéographe | First Class Pictures

Bijoux / Jarretière / masque | La Gartier

Shoes | Bella Belle Shoes 

Hair | Sherley, As God Made

Cake | Vanessa Joseph

Floral Designer | Le Lili Fleur

Location | Hôtel William Gray

Stationery | XKiz Solutions

Mobilier | Diva Location

We are an elite group of luxury bridal specialists and as per usual, failure was not one of my options.
We had 3 major visions to bring to life on the day of the shoot so I started by prepping her skin with a blend of Tatcha, Sundae Riley and Mac Cosmetics.
I created her skin look by applying small layers of Makeup Forever and Ben Nye.
Her lashes were from Sweed…I will definitely be repurchasing!
Last but no least, I finished her look by blending some Patrick Ta glow oil into her chest and back.

THE EYES
My first look was soft sandy cut crease to pair with the Havana dress.
Then I allowed myself to play with some SPARKLE for a pink color blocked eye. This one was for the outdoors looks and Ayé was wearing the Walker gown.
We then concluded on the Terrasse William Gray with a golden smokey eye for the Didi gown.

THIRD TASK: SHARE THE DREAM
If there was one question that was posed following the May 26th riots it was: How can I help???
I will try to make my answer as short as possible by confirming that:

– Voting is extremely important as it has direct effects on the social and economic state of the country you live in.
– I can also vouch for the fact that being anti racist both on and offline will have a direct co-relation to the quality of life your non-white counterparts can expect.
– And finally, as a former black child, I have to proclaim as loud as I can that representation matters.

Representation in media through the hiring of talent from a diversity of ethnic backgrounds.

Representation in office – back to why voting matters!
And representation in every art form you can think of.
You have no idea how many little black boys and girls are just waiting for the opportunity to see themselves in the positions they aspire to hold.
So when you see black art, and you like it, comment on it, critique it (constructively), and most importantly share it!

You just never know what child, teen or adult dreamer will be inspired by what they see and just how impact that can have!

I want to end by thanking the amazing team that collaborated in bringing to life and by thanking YOU, my reader for being here and sharing this journey with me!